California Central Coast Recipes

Dark Chocolate Hot Fudge Sauce

2017 TheRomanticTable.com
My Dark Chocolate Hot Fudge Sauce is so easy to make-providing you're organized, because you have to work fast on the stove-and you don't want spilled hot fudge on you-or the floor! (My first experience with hot fudge happened at the tender age of four when I reached up and pulled the hot fudge pan --and hot fudge-all over me, just as my mom turned her head. I think of that almost every time I get near hot fudge! Luckily there were no scars.) You can serve this hot fudge warmed on cold ice cream or chill it for various applications. --You could also use this for chocolate fondue-if you're so inclined.--Let your imagination soar!


www.theromantictable.com 2017, Dark Chocolate Hot Fudge Sauce
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 20 minutes
MAKES 6 SERVINGS.
re-calculate ingredients for:



Ingredients.

4 ounces Unsweetened baking chocolate
3 Tablespoons Unsalted butter
2/3 cups boiling water
1/2 cup granulated sugar
4 Tablespoons Corn syrup
1-1/2 teaspoons Vanilla extract


Preparation Directions.

1 Melt the chocolate and butter in a double boiler over boiling water. Stir and blend well.

2 While still over a double boiler, add the boiling water. Stir well then add the sugar and corn syrup. Stir again well.

3 Now switch to cooking over DIRECT HEAT, allow the sauce to boil GENTLY -but constant. Do NOT Stir! Allow to boil slowly without stirring for 8-9 minutes.

4 Remove from heat and let cool for at least 15 minutes. Stir in Vanilla extract and use or chill for later.

5 After setting, if the sauce is too thick, it may be reheated gently.


Wine and Food Pairing and Serving Suggestions.

Serve warm on ice cream, fruit or confections. Or lightly chill and use as a hard topping (when frozen) on specialty desserts such as Mud-Pie Romantic Table Style. Goes especially well with a good Port or Late Harvest Sangiovese or other Late Harvest wines.

A tip from Sue!

Know your stove!

Not all stoves are equivalent! Your "medium" may be equivalent to another's "high." For instance, a lot of recipes use the "Medium heat" burner. But that can be too high if your sauteing garlic and don't want it to burn. It's better to err toward the lower setting.